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Sunday, August 2, 2015

My Eulogy (Hopefully!)


Enoch walked faithfully with God; then he was no more, because God took him away. Genesis 5:24

I recently reflected on what I hoped others might say about me at my funeral. What virtues do I want eulogized about me? Every day I feel the tension to excel in my vocational calling, while keeping my highest priority my inner character development. Here are the four eulogy worthy virtues I pray others will have experienced during our time together in this life:


He Walked in Grace and Humility with Christ


Boyd’s imperfect faith leaned heavily on the perfect grace of God. Because he was saved by God’s grace, his desire was to live by God’s grace. Grace drew him to God, so he was able to draw others to his precious Savior Jesus. Boyd saw humility as a prerequisite to receiving grace.


He did not see himself humble, but hoped to be. Humility positioned him to really know others and be known by others. He esteemed them as more important. Humility is the key that unlocks character’s treasure chest. He walked with Christ and invited others to join them on the journey.


He Loved Well


Boyd understood love was a wealthy word. Because God is love, he desperately wanted to know God. For to know God is to know and understand love. Daily infusions of love from his heavenly Father grew his capacity to love well. His wife Rita felt his sacrificial love in his words and actions. His children and grandchildren were engaged in his love expressed by generosity with his time and money. Friends felt loved by his consistent care and concern. His love was flawed, but it flourished in the little things he did for others. He loved well, because he was well loved.


He Served Selflessly


Boyd’s heart was to serve like Jesus. Selfishly he knew service was a remedy for selfishness. He prayed each day to quietly meet a need. It might be a smile to communicate kindness to another bruised heart. It could be an affirmation by empathetically saying a person’s name while making eye contact. A written note, a phone call or a personal visit were his simple ways to serve. Co-workers and family members saw him be the first to do the worst. He was a joyful servant.


He Was Faithful to the Finish


Boyd believed it was one thing to start out life in a sprint of unbridled enthusiasm and determination, but it was an entirely different matter to do what matters most until the end of life. His faithfulness flowed from his love for Almighty God. He wanted to please the One whom he worshiped and revered most. He vowed to be faithful to his wife. A system of regular relational investments in his spouse and small group accountability helped him not stray too far from his wife’s heart. Faithfulness to the finish is a generational gift. It instructs and inspires those left.


Boyd was an imperfect person, whose heart was transformed and now perfected by Jesus Christ.


“Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen” (Ephesians 3:20-21).


Prayer: Heavenly Father, grow my character so my eulogy reflects Christ’s virtues.


~Wisdom Hunters Devotional~

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